(Source: erikasafaget)

Reblogged from themoonphase, 6,626 notes, March 9, 2014

juipiter:

-

juipiter:

-

(Source: thechocolatebrigade)

Reblogged from themoonphase, 99,008 notes, March 9, 2014

(Source: johnandwolf)

Reblogged from circumstance, 28,250 notes, March 9, 2014

serpentfire:

The World (For SERPENTFIRE Tarot)
© Devany Wolfe, 2014

serpentfire:

The World (For SERPENTFIRE Tarot)

© Devany Wolfe, 2014

Reblogged from serpentfire, 199 notes, February 14, 2014

echophon:

Gravity Pool

echophon:

Gravity Pool

Reblogged from lola-pastel, 1,448 notes, February 9, 2014

"The gods envy us. They envy us because we’re mortal, because any moment may be our last. Everything is more beautiful because we’re doomed. You will never be lovelier than you are now. We will never be here again."

Homer, The Illiad (via slychedelic)

Reblogged from psychonautical, 774 notes, January 18, 2014

animus-inviolabilis:

Bernagchen Mahakala Mandala
ca. 1700 - 1799Karma Kagyu LineageTibetBernagchen (Black-cloaked) Mahakala (represented as the curved knife above a skullcap in the very center of the mandala) with his consort, Shri Devi (represented as a kila peg, mirror, spear, and a snake lasso) are depicted symbolically in a triangular palace with T-shaped gates, further surrounded by bodily garlands to form a wrathful mandala of pristine awareness.

animus-inviolabilis:

Bernagchen Mahakala Mandala

ca. 1700 - 1799
Karma Kagyu Lineage
Tibet

Bernagchen (Black-cloaked) Mahakala (represented as the curved knife above a skullcap in the very center of the mandala) with his consort, Shri Devi (represented as a kila peg, mirror, spear, and a snake lasso) are depicted symbolically in a triangular palace with T-shaped gates, further surrounded by bodily garlands to form a wrathful mandala of pristine awareness.

Reblogged from animus-inviolabilis, 66 notes, January 14, 2014

5centsapound:

Ernst Haas: Himalayan Pilgrimage (Tibet, 1978)

The photographs included in this book were selected from thousands taken over a nine-year period. 

From book jacket:

The Himilaya is different things to different people. To Indians, it is the Himilaya, the “abode of snow”, mystical home of the gods, source of all their great and sacred rivers. To the rest of the world it is the Himilayas, the highest mountain range on earth, “the roof of the wordl”, where the towering peaks have always attracted adventurers and mountain climbers, as well as seekers of spiritual heights.

For Ernst Haas and his partner G. Minke, the Himalaya of India, and its neighboring countries is home for the Dalai Lama and for thousands of Tibetans who followed their leader into exile after China’s invasion of Tibet in the late 1950s. For years the authors longed to visit Tibet, “the forbidden country” and to study the unique culture and Buddhist religion of its people. In 1968 they were issued permission to begin their pilgrimage - to the refugee settlements of Mussoorie, Darjeeling, and Dharamasala, to Bhutan, Sikkim, Nepal and to other centers in the Himalaya. They participated in events that few outsiders ever witness - such as the Kalachakra Initiation, at which the fourteenth Dalai Lama officiated before a hundred thousand Lamaists from everywhere in the Himalaya. […] Himilayan Pilgrimage is a sensitive exploration of an area of the world that to most seems something of a fantasy.

*Despite being a master colour and motion photographer, most of Haas’s books are out of print. During his time his colour photography was considered ‘commercial’(cit), and consequently received little support from the art-world. Typically only black and white photography was considered a ‘pure’ art form worthy of museum support, because colour-dye processes were an innovation of the advertising world.

I have been lucky enough to inherit a copy of this out-of-print book, but for others aussie555 has scanned many of the images from Himalayan Pilgrimage, which you can view here.

Reblogged from 5centsapound, 1,886 notes, January 14, 2014

different-cultures-and-justice:

Tagong, Tibet,X

different-cultures-and-justice:

Tagong, Tibet,X

Reblogged from different-cultures-and-justice, 4 notes, January 13, 2014

Reblogged from de-norske-ulvene, 54 notes, January 13, 2014